Cancer Prevention

Understanding Estrogen Testing and Breast Cancer Risks

Risk of Breast Cancer? Do you know your estrogen metabolites?

Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S.

Estrogen alone is not the issue when it comes to increasing the risk of breast cancer. The real issue is how is your estrogen being metabolized. You want to have your doctor order a test that evaluates the estrogen metabolites. **I recommend the Dutch Test (https://dutchtest.com)

The liver converts estrogens into estrogen metabolites. Three of estrogen's metabolites, the breakdown products of this hormone, are 2-hydroxyestrone, 4-hydroxyestrone, and 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone.

Since the 1980s, 2-hydroxyestrone has been considered a "good" or chemoprotective form of estrogen, while 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone has been associated with the development of cancer. It can fuel the growth and division of hormone-dependent and other cancer cells more than the 2-hydroxyestrones can. The 2-hydroxyestrones, in contrast, have almost no estrogenic effect. Prevailing evidence has shown that the ratio of 2-hydroxyestrone to 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone is relevant as a risk factor for estrogen-sensitive cancers, including breast and cervical cancers. Simply put, when it comes to estrogen metabolites, you want more 2s than 16s. And guess what can help the body do that? Cruciferous vegetables.

Two components in cruciferous vegetables are indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and diindolylmethane (DIM). Studies have found that these compounds can inhibit the formation of the "bad" 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone estrogen metabolite. One study found that DIM had the ability to decrease its production by 50 percent while increasing production of the "good" 2-hydroxyestrone metabolite by 75 percent.

I3C is found in a number of cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, radish, rutabaga, and turnip. The highest concentrations are found in garden cress (different from watercress) and mustard greens.

Compliments of Functional Medicine University

www.functionalmedicineuniversity.com

Household Chemical That May Contribute To Breast Cancer

Chemical Triggers Breast Cancer

Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S

A study reveals that chemicals found in cleaning materials, textiles, plastics, paper and some personal-care products can trigger breast cancer.

According to the senior author of the study, William Baldwin, an assistant professor of biological sciences at the University of Texas at El Paso, the chemical called 4-nonylphenol binds to estrogen receptors in breast tissue which increases the risk for breast cancer.

Part of the problem is that the chemical, which mimics estrogen, may last longer in the body than natural estrogen.

How the Study was Conducted

Baldwin and his team compared the effects of giving differing doses of the chemical, 4-nonylphenol and estrogen to mice. When they followed mice genetically engineered to readily develop breast cancer over 32 weeks, many of those given 4-NP developed breast cancer while those given equivalent doses of estrogen did not.

Baldwin and other experts estimate that established risk factors such as aging, early onset of periods, late menopause, delayed childbearing and genetics explain only about 25 percent to 50 percent of breast cancers, and that environmental exposure plays a big role.

We can now test for this environmental toxin through a test called Toxic Element Core from Genova Diagnostics. The following is a test from one of my patients:

The good news is you can modify and reduce this toxic chemical. I recommend consulting with someone certified in functional medicine. They will have the training and knowledge to help one reduce this environmental toxin.

Compliments of Functional Medicine University.

www.functionalmedicineuniversity.com