Diabetes

Diabetes and Magnesium

Important Mineral Found to Reduce Risk of Diabetes by 10 to 34 percent.

Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S.

Study finds that adequate amounts of magnesium could reduce the risk of diabetes by 10 to 34 percent.

In a review of three studies of over 85,000 women and 42,000 men, individuals who consumed the most magnesium lowered their risk of developing diabetes more than 30 percent during the next 12 to 18 years compared to those who consumed the least amount. The studies suggest that magnesium influences the action of insulin in the body. A lack of magnesium may worsen insulin resistance, triggering the onset of diabetes. The current RDA for magnesium is 310-320 milligrams (mg) for adult women, and 400-420 mg for adult men. Average intake among Americans tends to lag about 100 mg below these recommended levels. Those most likely to have low blood levels include the elderly and those who take diuretic medications, which increase the excretion of magnesium. The best food sources of magnesium are green leafy vegetables, whole grains, nuts and dried beans.

References

Wang JL, Shaw NS, Yeh HY, Kao MD. Magnesium status and association with diabetes in the Taiwanese elderly. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2005;14(3):263-9.

Longstreet DA, Heath DL, Vink R. A potential link between magnesium intake and diabetes in Indigenous Australians. Med J Aust. 2005 Aug 15;183(4):219-220

Simsek E, Karabay M, Kocabay K. Assessment of magnesium status in newly diagnosed diabetic children: measurement of erythrocyte magnesium level and magnesium tolerance testing. Turk J Pediatr. 2005 Apr-Jun;47(2):132-7.

Compliments of Functional Medicine University

(www.FunctionalMedicineUniversity.com)

Diabetes and Neuropathy

The Answer to Diabetic Leg Pain?

Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S.

One of the complications of diabetes is peripheral neuropathy.

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of nerve damage which often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet.

People generally describe the pain of peripheral neuropathy as tingling or burning as well as a loss of sensation compared to a feeling of wearing a thin stocking or glove.

Peripheral neuropathy is a serious disease of blood vessels that supply the nerves as well as the nerves themselves


The most common drug prescribed for people suffering with diabetic related leg pain is Lyrica®.


But it comes with a huge price.


To be quite honest I have to wonder how this drug was ever approved.

One look at the PDR will get you wondering too.


Here is a punch-list of some of the recorded side effects:

  • Has an unexpectedly high incidence of hemangio-sarcoma (which is a cancer of blood vessels).

  • It raises your creatinine kinase (leads to kidney disease)

  • Lowers your platelet count

  • Causes changes in the EKG that can lead to heart block

  • Causes weight gain

  • Causes swelling of the ankles

  • Can cause life-threatening angioedema (swelling of the throat and face inhibiting breathing).

  • Causes retinal atrophy as well as corneal inflammation and calcification. (meaning you can go blind from it as it progresses to macular degeneration)

Can you believe that many of the above side effects are things that the diabetic patient is trying to avoid?


This drug just speeds up the likelihood that you will get the side effects a lot sooner.


To make matters worse any improvement the diabetic patient gets is short-lived and will commonly wear off after one year.


I simply don't understand why the public is not be told about proven solutions provided by thousands of dedicated and respected researchers around the globe.

I simply don't understand why the public is not be told about proven solutions provided by thousands of dedicated and respected researchers around the globe.

--


Yes, the research is overflowing with real non-drug answers to peripheral neuropathy. And the best part is most if not all of these solutions are free of side effects.


Seldom will you hear about physicians specializing in diabetes seeking to identify the underlying cause of this disease.


In the thousands of medical records I have reviewed from patients suffering from diabetes rarely, if ever, have I seen any note of looking for the cause.


Just one look at the medical references below should be quite convincing for nutrients that have actually reversed diabetic neuropathy such as acetyl-L-carnitine, lipoic acid, vitamin E, etc..


Considering these medical studies are from the very journals of diabetic specialists, I have to wonder why a physician would prescribe Lyrica when they have not first measured and corrected something as simple as ALC (acetyl-L-carnitine) for nerve regeneration?


As shown below there is an abundant amount of evidence showing the power of doing a thorough investigation for nutrient deficiencies and diabetic neuropathy.


Sometimes the answer could also be as simple as fixing a vitamins B1 or B6 deficiency. It all depends on what the person is low in. 




References:

*Sima AA, et al, Acetyl-L-Carnitine Study Group, Acetyl-L-carnitine improves pain, nerve regeneration, and vibratory perception in patients with chronic diabetic neuropathy: an analysis of two randomized placebo-controlled trials, Diabetes Care 28; 1:89-94, Jan 2005

*Quatraro A, et al, Acetyl L-carnitine for symptomatic diabetic neuropathy, Diabetologia 38:123, 1995

*Scarpini E, et al, Effect of acetyl-L-carnitine in the treatment of painful peripheral neuropathy is in HIV-positive patients, J Peripher Nern Syst 2: 250-2, 1997

*Zeigler D, et al, Alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of diabetic peripheral and cardiac autonomic neuropathy, Diabetes 46 suppl. 2: s 62-6, 1997

*Nakamura J, et al, Polyol pathway hyperactivity is closely related to carnitine deficiency in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. J Pharmacol Exp Ther, 287:897-902, 1998

*Tutuncu NB, et al, Reversal of defective nerve condition with vitamin E supplementation in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 21:1915-18, 1998

*Fedele D, et al, Peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Current recommendations and future prospects for its prevention and management, Drugs 54:414-21. 1997

*Ido Y, et al, Neural dysfunction and metabolic imbalances in diabetic rats. Prevention by acetyl-L-carnitine. Diabetes 43:1469-77, 1994

*Onofrij M, et al, Acetyl-L-carnitine as a new therapeutic approach for peripheral neuropathies with pain, Mt J Clin Pharmacol Res 15:9-15, 1995

*Lowitt S, et al, Acetyl-L-carnitine corrects the altered peripheral nerve function of experimental diabetes, Metab 44:677-80, 1995

*DeGrandis D, et al, Acetyl-L-carnitine in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. A long-term randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study, Drugs R D, 3: 223-31, 2002

*Abbas ZG, et al, Evaluation of the efficacy of thiamine and pyridoxine in the treatment of symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy, East African Med J, 74:803-8, 1997

*Koutsikos D, et al, Biotin for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Biotin may also reduce pain, Rimed Pharmacother 44:511-4, 1990

Compliments of Functional Medicine University

www.FunctionalMedicineUniversity.com

Alzheimers or Brain Diabetes

Alzheimer's or Brain Diabetes?

Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S.

A growing body of research suggests there's a powerful connection between your diet and your risk of Alzheimer's disease via similar pathways that cause type 2 diabetes.

Back in 2005, a published medical paper introduced a new disease tentatively dubbed "type 3 diabetes".

The researchers learned that, in addition to the pancreas, your brain also produces insulin.

They discovered that without the insulin your brain cells will die.

A drop in insulin production in your brain may contribute to the degeneration of your brain cells, and studies have found that people with lower levels of insulin and insulin receptors in their brain often have Alzheimer's disease.

Studies since 2005 have continually documented that insulin has a much greater role in the brain than previously expected.

Insulin is directly responsible for neuron glucose-uptake, and the regulation of neurotransmitters like acetylcholine, which are crucial for memory and learning.

Scientists have come to understand that cognition is impaired when insulin levels are reduced.

The clinical research has made it quite clear that the same pathological process that leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes may also hold true for your brain.

The take away from these studies make a strong point that the over-consumption of sugars and "grains" which are also detrimental to the the development of diabetes may also result in Type 3 Diabetes (brain diabetes).

When the brain becomes overwhelmed by the consistently high levels of glucose, the insulin signaling will eventually become blunted or desensitized. This will lead to impairments in your thinking and memory abilities, eventually causing permanent brain damage.

Healthcare clinicians trained in functional medicine have the training and knowledge to investigate what is at the root of the pathological process that leads to Type 2 diabetes and the new diagnosis of Type 3 diabetes.

The one size fits all approach of prescriptive medications for diabetes, although of some value, will not shut down the physiological cascade of the consequences of poor sugar/insulin control. 

Functional Medicine University

www.functionalmedicineuniversity.com

Alzheimer's or Brain Diabetes

Alzheimer's or Brain Diabetes?

Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S.

 

A growing body of research suggests there's a powerful connection between your diet and your risk of Alzheimer's disease via similar pathways that cause type 2 diabetes.

Back in 2005, a published medical paper introduced a new disease tentatively dubbed "type 3 diabetes".

The researchers learned that, in addition to the pancreas, your brain also produces insulin.

They discovered that without the insulin your brain cells will die.

A drop in insulin production in your brain may contribute to the degeneration of your brain cells, and studies have found that people with lower levels of insulin and insulin receptors in their brain often have Alzheimer's disease.

Studies since 2005 have continually documented that insulin has a much greater role in the brain than previously expected.

Insulin is directly responsible for neuron glucose-uptake, and the regulation of neurotransmitters like acetylcholine, which are crucial for memory and learning.

Scientists have come to understand that cognition is impaired when insulin levels are reduced.

The clinical research has made it quite clear that the same pathological process that leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes may also hold true for your brain.

The take away from these studies make a strong point that the over-consumption of sugars and "grains" which are also detrimental to the the development of diabetes may also result in Type 3 Diabetes (brain diabetes).

When the brain becomes overwhelmed by the consistently high levels of glucose, the insulin signaling will eventually become blunted or desensitized. This will lead to impairments in your thinking and memory abilities, eventually causing permanent brain damage.

Healthcare clinicians trained in functional medicine have the training and knowledge to investigate what is at the root of the pathological process that leads to Type 2 diabetes and the new diagnosis of Type 3 diabetes.

The one size fits all approach of prescriptive medications for diabetes, although of some value, will not shut down the physiological cascade of the consequences of poor sugar/insulin control.


Reference:

Steen E, Terry BM, Rivera EJ, Cannon JL, Neely TR, Tavares R, Xu XJ, Wands JR, de la Monte SM. Impaired insulin and insulin-like growth factor expression and signaling mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease--is this type 3 diabetes? J Alzheimers Dis. 2005 Feb;7(1):63-80.

de la Monte, Wands.Alzheimer's Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes–Evidence Reviewed, J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2008 Nov; 2(6): 1101–1113.

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